Trees at Christmas

Many people will be bringing a tree into their living room and dressing it with lights and tinsel. Others will delight in joining the crowds in Trafalgar Square in London to sing carols beneath the tree, the annual gift of the people of Norway in thanksgiving for their liberation and the role of the UK in defeating facism and nazism in the second world war.

Alongside your purchase of a Christmas tree, bear in mind those around the world who suffer the loss of trees and the devastating impact this has upon their livelihood, their environment and even their survival. Contribute the equivalent of the cost of your tree to an appeal for tree planting in denuded areas or purchase one of Oxfam Unwrapped’s ‘presents’ to plant trees. These will arrest soil erosion and enable the land to be productive and will provide fuel, food, and crucial shade for other crops, animals and people.

Help protect trees as part of environmental protection and economic development by supporting Oxfam Unwrapped and buying the ‘Save Trees’ gift. See http://www.oxfam.org.uk/shop/oxfam-unwrapped-eco-warriors/OU5051CL

As a faith community consider supporting an initative together. Trees can help act as flood barriers in vulnerable environments: see http://www.oxfam.org.uk/shop/oxfam-unwrapped-eco-warriors/OU5072CL

The UK is one of the least wooded countries in Europe; only 40% of these woods are native. Do you have room in your church’s garden to plant a native tree? If not, to plant a tree somewhere else in the UK go to: http://www.woodlandtrustshop.com/plant-a-tree

Trees have become a traditional part of a festive Christmas, but to many people in the world they are the means to survive and everywhere are an important part of the natural balance.